Secret Sound Clues

Secret Sound #2

"​UNTYING A SHOE, TAKING IT OFF, AND DROPPING IT ON THE FLOOR​"

  1. Some guys do it after prom: Guys who wear a freestyle bow tie with their formal prom attire will be UNTYING it afterward.

  2. No longer for your consideration: An idiomatic expression for withdrawing an option is TAKING it OFF the table.

  3. Unassigned to the project: To TAKE a person OFF a project is an idiom meaning to remove him or her from working on it.

  4.  Recall reaction: When a product has been recalled, retailers immediately TAKE it OFF the shelves.

  5.  Trading places: The SHOE is on the other foot is an idiom to mean that the situation has reversed or that two people have traded places or situations.

  6.  No help from the bunny for this part: There are bunny rhymes to help children learn how to tie their shoes, but not for UNTYING them.

  7.  First step to restoring her waist: Wearing a corset can draw in the waist by several inches. The first step to removing a corset is UNTYING the laces, so they can be loosened. Removing the corset will allow the wearer’s waist to return to its original size.

  8.  You might have to do this after the perfect game: In bowling, a perfect game is 300 points or achieving a strike in every frame. Once you finish bowling, you may have to UNTIE your rented bowling SHOES and TAKE them OFF.

  9.  Benefit of a halter hitch: A halter hitch is a quick release knot. A benefit of this type of knot is that it can be UNTIED quickly. 

  10.  This may happen right before exchanging rings: When a ring bearer is in a wedding party, UNTYING the ribbon on the ring bearer pillow proceeds exchanging rings.

  11.  Before the boat trip starts: A mooring operation involves tying and UNTYING of a boat using appropriate lines and cables and fixing them to mooring posts on the dock and vice versa.

  12.  Anticipatory anxiety: Waiting for the other SHOE to DROP is an idiomatic expression for anticipating for the next bad thing to happen.  Expecting the next bad thing to happen can cause anxiety.

  13.  Poised for career expansion: An idiomatic phrase for your career soon increasing or expanding is that it is about to TAKE OFF.

  14.  You don’t really need a tool for punishing someone hard: DROPPING the hammer is an idiomatic expressing that means to punish or deal with someone with great severity or ruthlessness.

  15. Gaga ovation: In the United States, throwing a SHOE on stage is a way to express a high compliment and respect to a singer or dancer. In 2011, when Lady Gaga was a judge on So You Think You Can Dance, she was so moved by a performance that she cried and threw her shoe on stage.

  16.  Screwing up big time: DROPPING the ball is an idiomatic expression for making a mistake or failing to do something important.

  17.  Where work gets done: ON THE FLOOR in a workplace, such as a retail store, factory or commercial kitchen, refers to where most workers do their work.

  18.  Idol judge’s premiere: The video for Jennifer Lopez’s 2011 song "ON THE FLOOR" premiered on American Idol when she was a judge on the show

  19.  Florentines and macaroons: Although not as popular as chocolate chip or oatmeal raisin, florentines and macaroons are also examples of drop cookies. Drop cookies are made by DROPPING batter from a spoon onto a cookie sheet for baking.

  20.  When you decide to eat or not to eat: When food is DROPPED ON THE FLOOR, do you eat it or not? The five second rule may apply.

  21.  A line toss: SHOE tossing is when shoelaces are tied and tossed over telephone or power lines so that the shoes hang loosely above the ground.

  22.  What you do if acquaintances really matter: Name DROPPING is the act of mentioning famous people you know.

  23.  Emphatic end: A mic drop is an emphatic and declarative gesture signifying the conclusion of a performance of note, often literally or as if DROPPING a microphone.

  24.  A place for yoga: Yoga is typically done on a mat ON THE FLOOR.

  25.  Suggestion for heat during 105.7 stunt: In 2014, the radio station Hot 105.7 in San Francisco played Nelly’s song “Hot in Herre” on an endless loop for 72 hours as a radio stunt to announce the station’s format change.  The song’s lyrics suggest TAKING OFF all your clothes because “it’s hot in here.”

  26.  Put the wax here: For hardwoods, you apply thin layer of wax ON THE FLOOR and then buff it to a shine.

  27.  Drake, Eminem and Macklemore have this in common: All three rappers have collaborations with Nike for Air Jordans. These three SHOES are among the most expensive sneakers of all time

  28.  Surprise visit: DROPPING in on someone or DROPPING by are expressions for a casual or unannounced visit.

  29.  Respectfully entering a house: In many cultures around the world, removing SHOES before entering homes is the norm. In most of Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East, shoes are never worn inside homes, and it can be seen as a sign of disrespect for guests to enter a host's home without leaving them at the door.

  30.  Boyz II Men sang they were gonna do it too: In their 1994 number one single “I’ll Make Love to You,” Boyz to Men sang, “Throw your clothes on the floor 'Cause I'm gonna TAKE my clothes OFF too.”

Secret Sound #1

“OPENING A FORTUNE COOKIE, BREAKING IT OPEN, AND PULLING OUT THE FORTUNE”

1. A reaction to a bear

During a financial downturn known as a bear market, investors often PULL OUT of the stock market.

 

2. Surprise!  You’re busted.

Another expression for busted is caught in the act. An idiomatic phrase for caught in the act is to be caught with your hand in the COOKIE jar. 

 

3. Same blueprint, different coat

COOKIE cutter is a slang term used to describe suburban housing developments where all of the houses are based on the same blueprints and are differentiated only by their color. Coat refers to paint covering.

 

4. Add a resting place for a giggle.

People jokingly add the phrase ‘in bed’ to the end of their aphorisms from FORTUNE COOKIES when reading them. A bed is a place where people sleep or rest.

 

5. Bull riders and boxers

Bull riders and boxers are considered to be some of the toughest athletes. A tough COOKIE is idiomatic expression that can mean an extremely tough and strong person, typically an athlete.

 

6. Veteran millionaire aid

Gabriel Fierro, an army Veteran from North Carolina, won $4 million in the lottery playing numbers from a FORTUNE COOKIE in January 2022.

 

7. Idris Elba first

In 2015, Idris Elba made history as the first solo man to appear on the cover of Maxim magazine. A maxim is aphorism or a short pithy statement like those found in FORTUNE COOKIES.

8. Pre-action for a bird in a nest

A baby bird in a nest must BREAK OPEN its eggshell when it hatches.

 

9. A burglar’s goal

Another word for burglar is safecracker. A safecracker’s goal is to BREAK OPEN a safe or vault.

 

10. Bill’s partner

FORTUNE COOKIES are often presented with the bill at the end of a meal in Chinese restaurants.

 

11. Part of a Madonna plea

Another word for plea is to request. OPEN is part of the song title in the Madonna single “Open Your Heart.” The lyrics request that someone open his or her heart.    

 

12. Cause of a magical switch up

In the 2003 film “Freaky Friday,” magical FORTUNE COOKIES cause a mother and daughter to swap bodies.